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Common Sense To Steer Clear of False Prophets, CS Commentary cont’d

Common Sense To Steer Clear of False Prophets, CS Commentary cont’d

a writer best known for his regular contributions to Charisma where he was a mentor of sorts to the Charisma publisher. The piece gets a few things wrong and a few things right about prophets and prophecy.

First, just because your prediction hasn’t come true – or hasn’t come true yet – it doesn’t mean that you are a false prophet (CS addresses this in Evaluating Prophets and Prophecy).

Second, anyone predicting the exact date of the rapture may be a false teacher rather than a false prophet – not because they end up being wrong, but – because Jesus said no one knows the specific time of His coming except the Father.

On the other hand, Buckingham is correct in saying that whenever prophets start charging money for their prophecies our red flags should go up. He is also right in warning that as believers we should not be pulled in to every rumor that claims that something supernatural has occurred. Believers should not only test doctrine through Scripture, we should test supernatural claims of ‘signs’ and appearances with common sense and thorough investigation.

How do we then live? As Buckingham suggests: as if He’s coming tomorrow, or not for a thousand years.